Tiger News

The latest Tiger Optics news, Tiger's newsletters, and mentions in the press and journals.

Tiger Optics Unveils Three New Products

The company will display its HALO QRP (quite reduced pressure) moisture analyser, developed for semiconductor manufacturers using low-temperature epitaxy (LT-Epi). With the shift to lower deposition temperatures and pressures, moisture has become the main culprit in oxide defects. The HALO QRP can monitor each process step and report real-time moisture concentration to the tool control system. The device easily operates at 1 Torr or less, in comparison to the company’ HALO RP, which is limited to 50 Torr.

Tiger Optics is equally focussed on its customers’ growing concerns with ambient molecules that lead to contamination of wafers. The company has therefore developed the new T-I Max platform for continuous AMC monitoring, designed to rapidly measure a specific analyte, with no cross-contamination or interference from other chemicals in the air.

The final product to be unveiled will be the new state-of-the-art AMC mobile cart to package its analysers for cleanroom environments. The cart can accommodate up to four T-I Max analysers and is also fitted with a top-mounted central control touchscreen.

Tiger Optics CEO Lisa Bergson, said, “Building on our decades of work with bulk and speciality gas in the sub-fab, we are also in the cleanroom, serving the industry’s tools and their micro-environments

July 14, 2017
Tiger's Tale Quarterly Newsletter 2017 Early Summer
June 09, 2017
Tiger's Tale Quarterly Newsletter 2016 Winter

Dopants and Specialty Gases are widely used in deposition processes in the semiconductor and solar industries. To save on transport fees, leading fabs in Asia are moving towards blending Germane at their locations, requiring on-site analysis. Our CRDS analyzers, with cost-saving low flow rates and fast speed of response, are ideal for moisture analysis in Arsine (AsH3), Phosphine (PH3), Ammonia (NH3) as pure gases, and mixture gases containing Germane (GeH4) and Phosphine (PH3) with Hydrogen (H2). 

April 19, 2017
Analyser Helps Safeguard NASA's Juno Mission Against Dangerous Contaminants

Along with NASA scientists, Tiger Optics LLC (USA) had reason to cheer when the Juno spacecraft successfully entered Jupiter’s orbit in July, capping its five-year journey from Cape Canaveral. Prior to Juno’s launch on August 5, 2011, a Tiger Optics trace-gas analyser helped NASA keep the scientific payload in prime condition.

As demonstrated in the Juno mission, Tiger Optics’ HALO trace-gas analyser plays a critical role in detecting contaminants that could compromise the performance of scientific instruments in space. Such scientific instruments are designed to operate in the vacuum of space, in the absence of chemicals present in the earth’s atmosphere: water, oxygen, and particulate matter. Prior to launch, the space-bound instruments must be protected from earthly contaminants by storing the payload under a flow of high-purity inert gas. Nitrogen is usually the inert gas chosen for the task. Typically, the moisture level in NASA’s high-purity nitrogen must be kept under 1 ppm. Tiger Optics’ HALO H2O analyser comfortably handled that requirement for the Juno mission, because the device measures moisture in a range from 2 ppb to 20 ppm.

After Juno entered Jupiter’s orbit on July 4, NASA scientists powered up the science instruments aboard the spacecraft for its first close “flyby” of the planet on August 27. On September 2, NASA reported that all eight of Juno’s science instruments were successfully energised and collecting data. Indeed, on the first of 36 scheduled orbital flybys, six megabytes of data were collected during the six-hour transit of the spacecraft from above Jupiter’s north pole to below its south pole. While analysis of the data is ongoing, NASA quickly published the first-ever images of Jupiter’s north pole.

“Tiger Optics is honoured that its technology is trusted to support our nation’s journey into the frontiers of space,” said Lisa Bergson, Tiger Optics’ chief executive. - See more at: here.

October 24, 2016
Tiger Optics’ analyser plays critical role in NASA’s successful Juno mission

The company’s HALO trace-gas analyser played a crucial role in detecting contaminants that could have compromised the performance of scientific instruments in space.

The space-bound sensing instruments were designed to operate in the vacuum of space without oxygen (O2), water or particulate matter and as such needed to be protected under a flow of high-purity inert gas.

Tiger Optics’ HALO H2O analyser was chosen to measure the quality of nitrogen (N2) flow as it can measure any moisture in a range from two parts per billion (ppb) to 20 parts per million (ppm).

Tiger Optics Chief Executive Lisa Bergson was thrilled with the company’s role in the project and stated, “Tiger Optics is honoured that its technology is trusted to support our nation’s journey into the frontiers of space.” 

The Juno spacecraft successfully entered Jupiter’s orbit on 4th July, capping its five-year journey from Cape Canaveral and by 2nd September, all eight instruments were successfully energised and began collecting data. Within days, NASA was able to publish the first-ever images of Jupiter’s north pole.

Tiger Optics will be discussing its latest progressions in the Internet of Things (IoT) in the upcoming edition of Specialty Gas Report.

September 22, 2016
Trace Gas Analyzer Joins NASA Mission

The HALO trace-gas analyzer from Tiger Optics (Warrington, Penn.) was used in NASA’s recent Juno mission to detect contaminants that could compromise the performance of scientific instruments in space. Such instruments are designed to operate in the vacuum of space, in the absence of chemicals present in the earth’s atmosphere: water, oxygen and particulate matter. Prior to launch, the space-bound instruments must be protected from earthly contaminants by storing the payload under a flow of high-purity inert gas. Nitrogen is usually the inert gas chosen for the task. Typically, the moisture level in NASA’s high-purity nitrogen must be kept under 1 ppm. Tiger Optics’ HALO H2O analyzer handled that requirement for the Juno mission—the device measures moisture in the range from 2 ppb to 20 ppm.

After Juno entered Jupiter’s orbit on July 4, NASA scientists powered up the science instruments aboard the spacecraft for its first close “flyby” of the planet on August 27. On September 2, NASA reported that all eight of Juno’s science instruments were successfully energized and collecting data. On the first of 36 scheduled orbital flybys, six megabytes of data were collected during the six-hour transit of the spacecraft from above Jupiter’s north pole to below its south pole.

September 21, 2016
Tiger Optics’ CRDS gas analyzer gives NASA’s Juno spacecraft mission a successful start

When NASA’s Juno spacecraft successfully entered Jupiter’s orbit in July of this year (2016), capping its five-year journey from Cape Canaveral, and captured the first-ever images of Jupiter’s polar regions, a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS)-based gas analyzer made by Tiger Optics (Warrington, PA) had everything to do with the prime condition of the spacecraft’s scientific payload; prior to Juno’s launch on August 5, 2011, the trace-gas analyzer helped NASA keep the scientific payload in prime condition.

As demonstrated in the Juno mission, Tiger Optics’ HALO trace-gas analyzer played a critical role in detecting contaminants that could compromise the performance of Juno’s scientific instruments in space. Such scientific instruments are designed to operate in the vacuum of space, in the absence of chemicals present in the earth’s atmosphere: water, oxygen, and particulate matter.

Prior to launch, the space-bound instruments must be protected from earthly contaminants by storing the payload under a flow of high-purity inert gas. Nitrogen is usually the inert gas chosen for the task. Typically, the moisture level in NASA’s high-purity nitrogen must be kept under 1 part per million (ppm). Tiger Optics’ HALO H2O analyzer easily handled that requirement for the Juno mission, as the device measures moisture in a range from 2 parts per billion (ppb) to 20 ppm.

After Juno entered Jupiter’s orbit on July 4, NASA scientists powered up the science instruments aboard the spacecraft for its first close flyby of the planet on August 27. On September 2, NASA reported that all eight of Juno’s science instruments were successfully energized and collecting data. Indeed, on the first of 36 scheduled orbital flybys, six megabytes of data were collected during the six-hour transit of the spacecraft from above Jupiter’s north pole to below its south pole. While analysis of the data is ongoing, NASA quickly published the first-ever images of Jupiter’s north pole.

Tiger Optics notes that its CRDS-based instruments gas analyzers and atmospheric and environmental monitors are used in ultraclean environments such as semiconductor fabs as well as harsh environments like coal-fired stacks.

For more info, see http://www.tigeroptics.com.

Source: Tiger Optics

September 21, 2016
TIGER OPTICS OPTIMIZES AMC MONITORING WITH A MOBILE CART

Tiger Optics LLC, responding to the semiconductor industry’s escalating need to continuously monitor airborne molecular contaminants (AMC) in cleanroom environments, said it is introducing a robust but compact mobile cart to accommodate multiple Tiger-i analyzers that excel in speciating trace amounts of the most vexing contaminants.

 

July 11, 2016
American Lab Pittcon Issue
May 01, 2016
H2O Analyzer in Photonics.com

H2O Analyzer

Photonics.com
Apr 2016
Tiger Optics LLCRequest Info
 

 
WARRINGTON, Penn., April 11, 2016 — Tiger Optics LLC has announced the Aloha+ H2O analyzer, refining the detection of moisture in ammonia to levels down to two parts per billion, achieving five times the sensitivity of incumbent technology.

The analyzer addresses the needs of high-brightness LED makers, tool manufacturers, purifier makers and the gas companies that supply ammonia for GaN semiconductor wafers.

The compact analyzer fits two to a 19-in. rack and features laser-based technology.
 
 
April 11, 2016
Tiger Optics in Gasworld Global Directory
April 04, 2016
Tiger's Tale Quarterly Newsletter 2016 Spring

The new ALOHA+ H2O advances trace moisture detection in ammonia to an unprecedented level of 2 parts per billion (ppb). The ALOHA+ H2O serves specialty gas and High-Brightness LED makers, as well as those developing advanced materials to power the Internet of Things. It offers the exceptional detection limits, accuracy, reliability, speed of response and ease of operation that you have come to expect.

March 31, 2016